We saw a very young Jerry Lewis

Image result for photo young martin and lewisJerry Lewis died last month at age 91.  He was a comedian, actor, singer, producer, director, screenwriter, and humanitarian. Wikipedia

Our dad took my brother Tom and me downtown  more than once.  One day, when we were maybe eleven and twelve, he took us with the plan that he would work in his office while we went to a movie and had lunch.  Then he would take us to to buy our first suits.

I don’t remember the movie we saw at the big Chicago Theater that day. But I do remember how we laughed at the young Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis, so silly and energetic.  The downtown theaters offered a stage show with the movie, so I think Martin and Lewis would have had to do 5 or 6 shows that day.

He was an interesting man, I think a good guy. RJN

They’ll Let Women Drive !

A woman behind the wheel in Saudi Arabia in 2013. . CreditFaisal Al Nasser/Reuters

By Abdullah Al-Shihri and Aya Batrawy Associated Press Chicago Tribune 9.27.17

RIYADH, Saudi Arabia —

Saudi Arabia on Tuesday announced that women will be allowed to drive for the first time in the ultra-conservative kingdom next summer, fulfilling a key demand of women’s rights activists who faced detention for defying the ban.
The kingdom was the only the country in the world to bar women from driving and for years had garnered negative publicity internationally for detaining women who defied the ban.
The move, which has been welcomed by the United States, represents a significant opening for women in Saudi Arabia, where women’s rights have slowly gained ground over the years. Saudi women remain largely under the whim of male relatives due to guardianship laws.
King Salman and his young son and heir, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, have tested the waters though, allowing women into the country’s main stadium in the capital, Riyadh, for national day celebrations this month. The stadium had previously been reserved for all-male crowds to watch sporting events. The king and his son have also opened the country to more entertainment and fun.
Women’s rights activists since the 1990s have been pushing for the right to drive, saying it represents their larger struggle for equal rights under the law.
Some ultraconservative clerics in Saudi Arabia, who wield power and influence in the judiciary and education sectors, had warned against allowing women to drive. They argued it would corrupt society and lead to sin.
Women will not be allowed to obtain licenses immediately. A committee will be formed to look into how to implement the order, which is scheduled to begin in June 2018.

Deafening mystery grows in Cuba

Physics of injuries, methods don’t add up, officials say
Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said Sunday the Trump administration is considering closing the U.S. embassy in Havana. (Desmond Boylan/AP 2015)
By Josh Lederman, Michael Weissenstein and Matthew Lee Associated Press
WASHINGTON — The blaring, grinding noise jolted the American diplomat from his bed in a Havana hotel. He moved just a few feet, and there was silence. He climbed back into bed. Inexplicably, the agonizing sound hit him again. It was as if he’d walked through some invisible wall cutting straight through his room.
Soon came the hearing loss, and the speech problems, symptoms both similar and altogether different from others among at least 21 U.S. victims in an astonishing international mystery still unfolding in Cuba.

The top U.S. diplomat has called them “health attacks.” New details learned by The Associated Press indicate at least some of the incidents were confined to specific rooms or even parts of rooms with laser-like specificity, baffling U.S. officials who say the facts and the physics don’t add up.
“None of this has a reasonable explanation,” said Fulton Armstrong, a former CIA official who served in Havana long before America re-opened an embassy there. “It’s just mystery after mystery after mystery.”
Suspicion initially focused on a sonic weapon, and on the Cubans. Yet the diagnosis of mild brain injury, considered unlikely to result from sound, has confounded the FBI, the State Department and U.S. intelligence agencies involved in the investigation.
Some victims now have problems concentrating or recalling specific words, several officials said, the latest signs of more serious damage than the U.S. government initially realized. The United States first acknowledged the attacks in August — nine months after symptoms were first reported.
It may seem the stuff of sci-fi novels, of the cloak-and-dagger rivalries that haven’t fully dissipated despite the historic U.S.-Cuban rapprochement two years ago that seemed to bury the weight of the two nations’ Cold War enmity.

But this is Cuba, the land of poisoned cigars, exploding seashells and covert subterfuge by Washington and Havana, where the unimaginable in espionage has often been all too real.
The Trump administration still hasn’t identified a culprit or a device to explain the attacks, according to interviews with more than a dozen current and former U.S. officials, Cuban officials and others briefed on the investigation. Most weren’t authorized to discuss the probe and demanded anonymity.
“The investigation into all of this is still under way. It is an aggressive investigation,” State Department spokeswoman Heather Nauert said last week. “We will continue doing this until we find out who or what is responsible for this.”
On Sunday, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said the Trump administration is considering closing down the U.S. embassy in Havana. Tillerson’s comments were the strongest indication to date that the United States might mount a major diplomatic response, potentially jeopardizing the historic restart of relations between the U.S. and Cuba.
“We have it under evaluation,” Tillerson said of a possible embassy closure. “It’s a very serious issue with respect to the harm that certain individuals have suffered.”
Investigators have tested several theories about an intentional attack — by Cuba’s government, a rogue faction of its security forces, a third country like Russia, or some combination thereof.

Yet they’ve left open the possibility an advanced espionage operation went horribly awry, or that some other, less nefarious explanation is to blame.
Aside from their homes, officials said Americans were attacked in at least one hotel, a fact not previously disclosed. An incident occurred on an upper floor of the recently renovated Hotel Capri, a 60-year-old concrete tower steps from the Malecon, Havana’s iconic, waterside promenade.
The cases vary deeply: different symptoms, different recollections of what happened. That’s what makes the puzzle so difficult to crack.
In several episodes recounted by U.S. officials, victims knew it was happening in real time, and there were strong indications of a sonic attack.
Some felt vibrations, and heard sounds — loud ringing or a high-pitched chirping similar to crickets or cicadas. Others heard the grinding noise. Some victims awoke with ringing in their ears and fumbled for their alarm clocks, only to discover the ringing stopped when they moved away from their beds.
The attacks seemed to come at night. Several victims reported they came in minute-long bursts.
Yet others heard nothing, felt nothing. Their symptoms came later.
The scope keeps widening. Last week, the State Department disclosed that doctors had confirmed another two cases, bringing the total American victims to 21. Some have mild traumatic brain injury, known as a concussion, and others permanent hearing loss.
Even the potential motive is unclear. Investigators are at a loss to explain why Canadians were harmed. Fewer than 10 Canadian diplomatic households in Cuba were affected, a Canadian official said. Unlike the U.S., Canada has maintained warm ties to Cuba for decades.
Sound and health experts are equally baffled. Targeted, localized beams of sound are possible, but the laws of acoustics suggest such a device would probably be large and not easily concealed. Officials said it’s unclear whether the device’s effects were localized by design or due to some other technical factor.
And no single, sonic gadget seems to explain such an odd, inconsistent array of physical responses.
“Brain damage and concussions, it’s not possible,” said Joseph Pompei, a former MIT researcher and psychoacoustics expert. “Somebody would have to submerge their head into a pool lined with very powerful ultrasound transducers.”
Other symptoms have included brain swelling, dizziness, nausea, severe headaches, balance problems and tinnitus, or prolonged ringing in the ears. Many victims have shown improvement since leaving Cuba and some suffered only minor or temporary symptoms.
After the U.S. complained to Cuba’s government earlier this year and Canada detected its own cases, the FBI and the Royal Canadian Mounted Police traveled to Havana to investigate.
FBI investigators swept the rooms, looking for devices. They found nothing, several officials briefed on the investigation said.
In May, Washington expelled two Cuban diplomats to protest the communist government’s failure to protect Americans serving there. But the U.S. has taken pains not to accuse Havana of perpetrating the attacks.
Cuba’s government declined to answer specific questions about the incidents, pointing to a previous Foreign Affairs Ministry statement denying any involvement, vowing full cooperation and saying it was treating the situation “with utmost importance.”
“Cuba has never, nor would it ever, allow that the Cuban territory be used for any action against accredited diplomatic agents or their families, without exception,” the Cuban statement said.

Airline Women Forbidden to Marry!

 

At one time a major US airline had a rule that stewardesses may not marry!

I learned about that while I was Grievance Officer for our local teachers’ union.

Preparing to argue a grievance against our school board in arbitration, I conferred with our lawyer who suggested the tactic of estoppel.

He said his firm had represented the stewardesses of a major airline where many had been fired for  violating the no-marriage rule.  At one point their union reps had come away from a bargaining session with the understanding that the airline had agreed to rescind the rule and they posted a notice of that on bulletin boards on appropriate airline property.

Happy stewardesses promptly started wearing their wedding rings to work and were promptly fired.

The union objected, arguing that the airline had to know what the union’s understanding was and so was estopped from the firings.

A funny thing:  I and the board had agreed to save money by substituting a sound recording for a court reporter so that a typist would have to work from the tape.  When she came to the unfamiliar term estoppel, she wrote gestapo! That amused everyone, and I didn’t bother to have the transcript corrected.

RJN

 

Women Too Big to Fly?

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Flight attendant wins discrimination case against Aeroflot  source


FILE – In this file photo taken on Thursday, Aug. 3, 2017, Aeroflot flight attendant Yevgeniya Magurina shows her uniform during an interview with the Associated Press in Lobnya, outside Moscow, Russia. A Moscow court has ruled in favor of Magurina who claimed that Russia’s flagship airline Aeroflot discriminated against her based on appearance.. (Alexander Zemlianichenko, FILE/Associated Press)
 September 6 at 12:27 PM
MOSCOW — A Moscow court on Wednesday ruled in favor of a flight attendant who said Russia’s flagship airline stopped assigning her to work long-haul international flights because of her weight.The Moscow City Court overturned a ruling by a district court that had rejected Yevgeniya Magurina’s contention that she was sidelined as part of Aeroflot’s drive to make its cabin crews younger and more physically attractive.The flight attendant’s lawsuit put a spotlight on how women in Russia are still often judged by their looks, not their skills.The 42-year-old Magurina had submitted pay slips showing that she had stopped receiving bonus pay, which comprised roughly 20 percent of her income, after she asked for a larger-sized uniform. She also says she no longer was assigned the role of senior steward after asking for a bigger uniform.
(NOTE) I heard on BBC that that Aeroflot had defended its policy against  large women by asserting that 1–they took up too much cabin space 2–their weight raised costly fuel consumption.  I laughed out loud.  RJN)
Magurina had requested 500,000 rubles ($8,700) in damages and for the court to rule that Aeroflot’s regulations on clothing sizes is discriminatory. The court on Wednesday upheld Magurina’s discrimination claim, ordered Aeroflot to pay her the missing bonus pay but awarded her just 5,000 rubles ($87) in damages.

Her attorney welcomed the ruling, calling it “definitely a victory.”

“We were not suing for money. We wanted the court to acknowledge that you cannot treat people like that,” lawyer Ksenia Michaylichenko said.

Flood–pets and great people

Notes on radio reports for which I haven’t found stories  to include here (RJN).

Suppose you were offered rescue in a flood but would have to leave your dogs, cats, birds behind.  So hard!  Some people have refused rescue and died with their pets.  That’s why the Texas legislature is considering a law requiring rescuers to take animals.  Think of all the problems in the arenas and other rescue centers!

–A family whose house was safe from flooding looked at their snorkel-equipped jeep with their inflatable kayak and said, “Why not?”  With this special equipment, they went to a village for the elderly. At a house their jeep could not approach, they took the kayak in and brought out a couple.  The man had had recent heart surgery.  They went on to make 14 more pick-ups.

Nurse Arrested

Nurse dragged out of hospital, arrested for doing her job

A nurse in Utah was forcibly arrested after she refused to draw blood from an unconscious patient, screaming “I’ve done nothing wrong” as an officer dragged her out of a hospital.Video footage of the interaction between nurse Alex Wubbels and Salt Lake City police Detective Jeff Payne on July 26 at University Hospital in Salt Lake City shows the nurse calmly explaining to the detective that blood cannot be taken without a warrant from an unconscious patient unless he or she consents or that individual has been arrested.

“This is something that you guys agreed to with this hospital,” Wubbels says while showing Payne the policy in writing. “The three things that allow us to do that are if you have electronic warrant, patient consent or patient under arrest … and neither of those things … the patient can’t consent, he told me repeatedly that he doesn’t have a warrant and the patient is not under arrest. So, I’m just trying to do what I’m supposed to do, that’s all.”

A 2-minute video of the interaction then cuts to Wubbels holding a phone, as a man’s voice warns that a “huge mistake” is being made by threatening a nurse. That sets off Payne, who then places Wubbels in handcuffs and leads her out of the hospital as the woman shrieks in agony.

“OK, no, we’re done, we’re done — you’re under arrest,” Payne says. “We’re going, we’re done, we’re done, I said we’re done!”

“You can’t put me under arrest, this is not OK,” Wubbels says while backpedaling before being led out of the hospital. “Somebody help me. Stop! You’re assaulting me, stop! Stop — I’ve done nothing wrong!”

Two hospital officials then try to intervene, but Payne warns them not to interfere or they will be arrested as well.

“I’m leaving now — with her — anybody who wants to prevent that, that’s your option,” Payne says. “So, take your hand off her, please.”

Payne then leads Wubbels to a waiting police vehicle as the woman claims the officer is hurting her.

“Then walk!” the officer responds.

“What is going on?” Wubbels tearfully asks another employee at the hospital.

Parts of the footage were shown Thursday during a news conference held by attorney Karra Porter, who is representing Wubbels, the Salt Lake Tribune reports. Wubbels, who was not charged, told the newspaper that she’s watched the footage about five times.

“It hurts to relive it,” she said.

Hospital officials, meanwhile, said they supported Wubbels’ actions.

“She followed procedures and protocols in this matter and was acting in her patient’s best interest,” according to a statement obtained by The Post. “We have worked with our law enforcement partners on this issue to ensure an appropriate process for moving forward.“

No notice of claim or lawsuit had been filed as of Thursday, but Porter had discussions with the department, which will provide better training to its officers, she said.

Payne, meanwhile, has been suspended from the department’s blood-draw program, but remains on duty as an investigation is conducted, Salt Lake City police Sgt. Brandon Shearer told the Salt Lake Tribune.